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Trine Bumiller

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Trine Bumiller

What is a monument but a memorial to a location or a moment in time? What we choose to memorialize and make monuments to reflect our history, our culture and our need to remember. Trine Bumiller’s 129 paintings depict all of the U.S. national monuments that were created to honor and protect places of cultural, environmental, and cultural importance. To add another layer, the paintings are all rendered in hues of pink to represent all phases of feminism, from baby blush and sexy hot pinks to reds of passion, rage and love.

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Fawn Atencio

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Fawn Atencio

Fawn Atencio has recently been exploring how we connect to land as a form of identity. “I am interested in how places tell stories, create memories, and transfer meaning,” says Atencio. Growing up in Colorado, her grandparents were avid fishermen and women who, year after year took Atencio and her siblings to explore, fish, and camp in the Rio Grande National Forest. “The landscape seemed very magical to me as a child. It wasn’t until I spent an extensive period of time Asia and northern Africa as an adult, that I realized how much of my identity is formed by the American Western landscape.”

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Micheline Klagsbrun

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Micheline Klagsbrun

Micheline Klagsbrun’s latest body of mixed media work on paper originated in a found object: a ledger containing observations of the 1874 Transit of Venus, a phenomenon occurring every 243 years when the planet Venus moves across the face of the sun, twice. Astronomers over the centuries, dating back 5000 years ago to the Sumerians, have tracked her movements and seen her as divine. The Transit of Venus becomes an entry point into a variety of inter-related ideas, celestial and astronomical, scientific and mythological, all of which become themes in the work. The depths of ocean and cosmos are evoked by Klagsbrun's creative use of cyanotype, a 19th-century photographic printing technique that produces deep indigo shades over which she layers drawings in ink and pencil.

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Danielle DeRoberts + Lindee Zimmer

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Danielle DeRoberts + Lindee Zimmer

What do you attract? What do you emit? How do you balance the two? Magnetic/Radiating is the exploration of balance between attracting and emitting. Stored in the soft folds. Tucked in the deep tissue of our bones. Woven into our neurons. We carry our pain from trauma, from recent events, from our childhoods and/or from previous lives. Stored like a secret in our bodies. Through introspection, internal processing and arduous work the pain is liberated. The pain is unwound. Detached from our physical body. Energy is released. When cultivated it can be converted to beauty. Radiating into the world.

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Favianna Rodriguez

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Favianna Rodriguez

Favianna Rodriguez is an interdisciplinary artist, cultural strategist, and social justice activist based in Oakland, California. Her art and praxis address migration, economic inequality, gender justice, sexual freedom and ecology. Her practice boldly reshapes the myths, ideas, and cultural practices of the present, while confronting the wounds of the past.  Favianna’s signature mark-making embodies the perspective of a first-generation American Latinx artist with Afro-Latinx roots who grew up in working-class Oakland, California during the birth of internet, and in the midst of an era of anti-immigrant hate and the war on drugs. 

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Emily Palmquist

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Emily Palmquist

Home Fire was composed alongside a series of moves that set Emily Palmquist voyaging from west to east and west again. This fluttering about left Palmquist and her work double-taking for a sense of place and connection. The results invite viewers to step into a narrative of mixed origins where the familiar comingles with the projected, the past, the day-dreamed, and other deviating realms.  

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Ron Scharfe

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Ron Scharfe

Ron Scharfe’s abstract modern art paintings are the result of color and form interacting, and the beauty and movement emerging from their interplay. Scharfe is inspired by exploration. “When you explore, the unexpected happens: color upon color; form upon form…movement creating shapes, which are suddenly rearranged into some other order. Mimicking impermanence, revealing and yet disguising what lies beneath.”

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Katy Parnello

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Katy Parnello

Katy Parnello's newest collection, Visceral grew from a desire to create space for her family.  Realizing on a deeper level the importance of environment, she created a comforting and inspiring room that provides strength, support and a reminder of what is possible.  Her stand alone pieces can be hung on walls or incorporated into the architecture of a building to further support and encourage the sensory experience of life.

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Jorge Anchondo

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Jorge Anchondo

Jorge Anchondo lives in Ridgway. He has studied in plenty of places and received plenty of degrees. Although he may be known more for his pigs than his paintings, art has been his life for over half a century. He paints because it provides a space to think and meditate. His paintings do not have anything at all to do with painting as painting, perhaps more with painting as a vehicle to let him wander in another land.

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Chris Roberts-Antieau

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Chris Roberts-Antieau

The colorful, humorous, and hopeful fabric works of New Orleans artist Chris Roberts-Antieau will be on display at Gallery 81435 through September 2018. Chris Roberts-Antieau is a self-taught pioneer of machine embroidery. Her main body of work, which she calls “fabric paintings,” are highly sophisticated tapestries created in her signature style of fabric appliqué and intricate embroidery, crafted on a simple Bernina sewing machine. Antieau’s subject matter ranges from joyfully candid cultural commentary depicting unbelievable true stories to more personal reflections on nature, perception, reality, and truth.

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Jason Lee Gimbel

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Jason Lee Gimbel

Known for his monumental figurative paintings, Jason Lee Gimbel renders full figure works through abstraction-expressionist brushwork and vibrant colors. Gimbel’s instinctual approach, random use of color and mark making pushes figurative work to the edges of representation and, in some instances, into abstraction. These painted drawings break up the surface through a visual harmony that disrupts the partially outlined figures, providing the viewer with a complex balance between the merger of the figure and background.

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Gregory Botts

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Gregory Botts

Every spring, Gregory Botts drives across the country from New York City to Abiquiu, New Mexico. Along the way, he visits natural areas and begins his works as plein air paintings. Each year, a narrative emerges in the paintings. A southern route through Florida, Louisiana, and Texas has heavily influenced the past five years. This particular direction points to an imaginative poetry sought out by Botts. The plein air paintings typically emphasize a concern for endangered environments. These paintings also serve as references in Botts’ studio paintings. In his studio, Botts enlarges imagery remembered from his trips and uses his plein air paintings to guide his ideas and artwork. After a simple narrative is formed, a poetry of symbols arises from the repetition and simplification of forms. In this type of painting, the Earth itself has become a character – playing the ideal part of the hero. 

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Trine Bumiller

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Trine Bumiller

March 2018 at Gallery 81435

Trine Bumiller explores the relationship between memory and experience through paintings and installations that balance on the edge of both abstract and environmental concerns.  She has a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and studied in Rome with the European Honors Program. 

Trine has had many exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Solo shows include the McNichols Building in Denver, the University of Wyoming Art Museum, the Las Cruces Museum of Art and most recently at the International Arts Festival of Sarajevo in Bosnia and Herzegovina. She has received grants from Colorado Council on the Arts and Colorado Federation of the Arts and been an artist in residence at Yaddo, Denali National Park, and Rocky Mountain National Park. Her work has been reviewed in Art in America, artltd., ArtNews, the New Art Examiner, the Christian Science Monitor, the Denver Post, and Westword. She is on the board of Denver Art Museum’s DAM Contemporaries.

Trine’s large-scale public art can be seen at the Colorado Convention Center, the Four Seasons Denver, the Peninsula Hotel Hong Kong and the University of Colorado and many other places. She is represented by Robischon Gallery, Denver, Markel Fine Arts, New York and Zg Gallery, Chicago.

Learn more at www.trinebumiller.com

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Nancy B. Frank

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Nancy B. Frank

"What amazes me most about the partnership with a horse is that they allow us on their backs, but that is exactly what creates the tension in my paintings; the partnership between equine and human.  The images are larger than life yet intimate, and hopefully, capture the beauty and power and grace of the horse, yet the horses are bitted and bound with reins.  The human factor is always present, but never within the frame except for perhaps a suggestion. It is the special agreement and the spirit of both which make the paintings shine with light and life."

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Flair Robinson

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Flair Robinson

Be Unbroken is Flair Robinson's newest large-scale installation highlighting the healing power of the natural world. "Many people are in a state where the world feels broken. When we separate ourselves from nature, we are not at our best. Being out there in it is being whole." Robinson's imagery, colors, and environment remind us not only of our universal place, but also the confluence of the earthly and the eternal. A vibrant orange coyote anchors the installation as the guardian and harbinger. The cleansing rain, the attentive moon, the persisting waterfall, and other symbolic images unify to create an atmosphere both grounding and mystical. Although a personal journey for the artist, Be Unbroken carries a resonant and timely message.

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Margaret Rinkevich

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Margaret Rinkevich

Margaret’s work develops intuitively.  It is composed of a confluence of multiple sensations drawn from her own experiential landscape.  There is an all-consuming mental grind in the creative process, and her objective is to achieve visually arresting images.  The goal in this series is to make the apparently simple relationships of form and color charged with as much force, feeling and meaning as possible.

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Micheline Klagsbrun

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Micheline Klagsbrun

On a simple level, Micheline Klagsbrun began with the intention to display side-by-side work done in her East Coast studio with work done here in Telluride. She has always been interested in the sense of place in art. At a deeper level, Klagsbrun is also fascinated by the parallels that can be found between cultures widely separated by time and geography.

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Dabbs Anderson

Dabbs Anderson

“There is an undeniable sense of danger and power in using fire to create a drawing; and there lies a grotesque, but grounding, beauty in using bacon to create a painting. Perhaps the combination of the two is American.” Anderson is interested in the way environments and their people shape how one interprets their experiences. Oscillating between energetic moments of inspiration and long periods of study and focus is essential to Anderson’s practice. Sketches and drawings from travels formed with careful but emotional mark making weave a history of journey among the creatures.

Betsy Chaffin

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Betsy Chaffin

Next Move is inspired by an Albert Einstein quote, “Life is like a bicycle.  To keep your balance you must keep moving.”  This work demonstrates some of my “moving”--- recent visual exploration to continue developing my vocabulary and sensibility.  Abstracted shapes mingle with more figurative elements and old ideas and concerns struggle to find new expressions. The paintings are metaphors for past experiences and memory.

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Rebecca Harrell

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Rebecca Harrell

Rebecca Harrell’s work is rooted in an interest in evolving landscapes, human interventions with the natural world, and geologic formations. She is interested in the contrast between slowly evolving natural forms and rapidly expanding, urban settings. The result is a visual dialog around scale, source imagery and space. Harrell exaggerates that tension through material and formal choices.

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