Ally Crilly

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Ally Crilly

MOONS

DECEMBER 2018 + JANUARY 2019 | TELLURIDE ARTS HQ GALLERY

Telluride Arts’ HQ gallery in Telluride, CO presents, Moons, a solo exhibit by painter Ally Crilly. The show opens December 5, 2018 and runs through the month of January 2019. The Art Walk opening reception will be held Thursday, January 3, 2019 5 - 8 pm. There will be no Art Walk in December 2018.

In her exhibit, Moons, Ally Crilly explores her relationship with the moon and its power. The beauty, the pull, and the altered state it puts her in. She is particularly curious about indigenous cultures’ respect to the moon. Crilly loves the names given to the different moons by different cultures. She is also learning to love painting portraits. “I find a human with a moon so beautiful and these portraits will try to convey the magic of the moon and our relationship to it.” For Crilly, painting is how she can best tell the truth. It is a messy, unpredictable process. “When the flow is happening, I know I’m supposed to paint. When it’s not, it’s excruciating. I’m learning to paint regardless and wait for the moments that it makes sense in, and just ride the rest of them out. I’m also learning to do this in my life. Art has to surprise me in some way for it to interest me.”

Crilly studies and practices yoga. Painting is a spiritual practice as well. “I try to show up with a beginner mind and see what will happen,” says Crilly. She lives and works in Ridgway, Colorado, but grew up back east in New York. “I love art, mountains, my family, yoga, and figuring out how to be a human being.” Crilly works as an artist, yoga teacher, and free-lance graphic designer.

The show runs through January 2019 at Telluride Arts HQ Gallery, located at 135 W Pacific in Telluride, Colorado. Open daily from 12-6pm or by appointment. 

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Katy Parnello

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Katy Parnello

DECEMBER 2018 + JANUARY 2019 | GALLERY 81435

Visceral adj.

1. Relating to, situated in, or affecting the viscera 
     1a. Viscera pl.n. Collectively, internal organs of the body, especially those contained within the abdominal and thoracic cavities, such as the liver, heart or stomach
2. Being or arising from impulse or sudden emotion rather than from thought or deliberation

Katy Parnello's newest collection, Visceral grew from a desire to create space for her family.  Realizing on a deeper level the importance of environment, she created a comforting and inspiring room that provides strength, support and a reminder of what is possible.  Her stand alone pieces can be hung on walls or incorporated into the architecture of a building to further support and encourage the sensory experience of life.

Katy Parnello first premiered her Electroliers, intricately designed wood wall hangings with incandescent lights, in July 2014.  What began as a boutique collection of functional art pieces has grown into large scale creations such as doors, full ceiling chandeliers and custom wall installs in restaurants, hotels and homes.  Whether large or small, her pieces celebrate the life and spirit of the wood.  Each piece silently evolves a space into a charged, beautiful, sexy and serene sanctuary, the type of room where you will desire to remain. 

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Jorge Anchondo

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Jorge Anchondo

Jorge Anchondo lives in Ridgway. He has studied in plenty of places and received plenty of degrees. Although he may be known more for his pigs than his paintings, art has been his life for over half a century. He paints because it provides a space to think and meditate. His paintings do not have anything at all to do with painting as painting, perhaps more with painting as a vehicle to let him wander in another land.

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Elisa Gomez

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Elisa Gomez

This series was painted as a reflection and re-examination of Elisa Gomez’s studies of nature and traveling. With a much more loose and flowing approach, Gomez wanted to express the connection she has with music and nature and how they feed into one another. She strives to break barriers within this body of work, creating colors and textures that are free of spatial separations and less linear. This series comes from a place where Gomez’s expression loses words and can only be shown through her paintings.

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Carl Marcus

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Carl Marcus

This exhibit is the product of 5000 photos, shot over three years, during all four seasons, in the Hunter College 68th Street subway station. The intent is to visually present the human stories which we all hear in our minds as we scan the images. Carl Marcus is typically known for his large format landscape and portrait photography. He was born in New York City and moved to Telluride forty years ago.

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Chris Roberts-Antieau

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Chris Roberts-Antieau

The colorful, humorous, and hopeful fabric works of New Orleans artist Chris Roberts-Antieau will be on display at Gallery 81435 through September 2018. Chris Roberts-Antieau is a self-taught pioneer of machine embroidery. Her main body of work, which she calls “fabric paintings,” are highly sophisticated tapestries created in her signature style of fabric appliqué and intricate embroidery, crafted on a simple Bernina sewing machine. Antieau’s subject matter ranges from joyfully candid cultural commentary depicting unbelievable true stories to more personal reflections on nature, perception, reality, and truth.

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Brucie Holler

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Brucie Holler

As a non-representational painter, Brucie Holler’s work is influenced by the landscape and the idea of a sense of place. The relationship between the sky, water, and land is what compels Holler the most. “I’m always hoping to find a connection that is not too literal, the gray sky and water of winter, the squall lines in the spring, the gathering of the summer storm, the flight path of seabirds, the golden light of autumn that illuminates all it touches.” It is within this artistic paradigm that Holler searches for a sublime and quiet beauty in her paintings.

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Jason Lee Gimbel

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Jason Lee Gimbel

Known for his monumental figurative paintings, Jason Lee Gimbel renders full figure works through abstraction-expressionist brushwork and vibrant colors. Gimbel’s instinctual approach, random use of color and mark making pushes figurative work to the edges of representation and, in some instances, into abstraction. These painted drawings break up the surface through a visual harmony that disrupts the partially outlined figures, providing the viewer with a complex balance between the merger of the figure and background.

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Gregory Botts

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Gregory Botts

Every spring, Gregory Botts drives across the country from New York City to Abiquiu, New Mexico. Along the way, he visits natural areas and begins his works as plein air paintings. Each year, a narrative emerges in the paintings. A southern route through Florida, Louisiana, and Texas has heavily influenced the past five years. This particular direction points to an imaginative poetry sought out by Botts. The plein air paintings typically emphasize a concern for endangered environments. These paintings also serve as references in Botts’ studio paintings. In his studio, Botts enlarges imagery remembered from his trips and uses his plein air paintings to guide his ideas and artwork. After a simple narrative is formed, a poetry of symbols arises from the repetition and simplification of forms. In this type of painting, the Earth itself has become a character – playing the ideal part of the hero. 

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Molly Perrault

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Molly Perrault

Molly Perrault’s Regeneration is comprised of works created entirely out of magazine paper. Using tiny shards of found colors and textures, Perrault strives to create an illusion of oil painted landscapes sans paint. She views her process as cyclical: nature is used to produce the paper in which the magazines are printed, and Perrault assumes her role in both the act of destruction and reconstruction.

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Austin Halpern

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Austin Halpern

Austin Halpern is a fine art photographer captivated by nature’s abstract splendor. With a camera in his hands, Austin says he has become attentive to little miracles like the colors reflected in moving water at dusk and the way street lights glow upon asphalt after it rains.Just as a sweeping landscape photograph is majestic and impressive, so are the big, extraordinary moments in life. And yet, what if we viewed the every day with such attention, contemplation, and wonder? The ordinary occurrences of nature can offer us something immensely intimate and creative. Take a look around you. Is This Water? invites us to see differently, to see more—and possibly even, to make meaning.

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Trine Bumiller

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Trine Bumiller

March 2018 at Gallery 81435

Trine Bumiller explores the relationship between memory and experience through paintings and installations that balance on the edge of both abstract and environmental concerns.  She has a BFA from Rhode Island School of Design and studied in Rome with the European Honors Program. 

Trine has had many exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Solo shows include the McNichols Building in Denver, the University of Wyoming Art Museum, the Las Cruces Museum of Art and most recently at the International Arts Festival of Sarajevo in Bosnia and Herzegovina. She has received grants from Colorado Council on the Arts and Colorado Federation of the Arts and been an artist in residence at Yaddo, Denali National Park, and Rocky Mountain National Park. Her work has been reviewed in Art in America, artltd., ArtNews, the New Art Examiner, the Christian Science Monitor, the Denver Post, and Westword. She is on the board of Denver Art Museum’s DAM Contemporaries.

Trine’s large-scale public art can be seen at the Colorado Convention Center, the Four Seasons Denver, the Peninsula Hotel Hong Kong and the University of Colorado and many other places. She is represented by Robischon Gallery, Denver, Markel Fine Arts, New York and Zg Gallery, Chicago.

Learn more at www.trinebumiller.com

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Mara Manning

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Mara Manning

Mara Manning - March 2018

Telluride HQ Gallery

"My work is about a sense of place, a vague memory of being there. These landscapes and cityscapes are not windows like a traditional landscape format. Rather, I am instead exploring the space as we pass through it. Whether driving by in a car or moving in other forms of transportation we experience our environment in momentary glimpses. Parts of these remain in our subconscious as memories and images. They are flattened and stacked. In my paintings I find myself gravitating to a simple house shape as my subject matter. Houses, farm buildings and warehouses have always sparked my storytelling imagination. I see personalities, expressions, and faces in buildings that I take photos of and record in sketchbooks. By layering the buildings or using the shape individually I am able to conjure a feeling of place for me and the viewer. We may not see the same place in the piece but it brings about an immediate reaction, often a “naming” of where the scene is located.

I am painting with wax media because it allows me to explore a richness in layers, color and textures using a variety of tools and handmade templates. I have almost left my brushes behind, gravitating toward palette knives and other devices that let me layer, scrape and draw on the surface. I like to excavate into the painting revealing parts of previous layers. The wax medium allows me explore this type of versatility on the birch panels. My process explores the painting surface as I expose or mask particular layers and colors. I look to the history of art to inform my color schemes, specifically the Dutch Baroque period. I love the richness and saturation found in works from that era. As I settle on a color scheme for the pieces I allow composition and mood to drive the painting. I work using photos as inspiration. The loose grid I begin with provides a landscape in which I can start to nestle, isolate or crowd together the buildings, roads and bridges. Windows, lines, textural marks are added near the end of the process. Each layer of cold wax and oil is fused using a low temp heat gun. Fine lines are made with oil pastel. In the final stages of the pieces I allow them to cure and then burnish the wax to create a soft luster on the surface where it is the thickest."

Mara is a UW Milwaukee graduate with a BFA in Painting & Drawing. She earned her teaching certificate as an Art Educator from UW-Green Bay and received a Master of Arts in Education from Lesley University. Some of her early influences as an artist included instruction and vision from Leslie Vansen, Adolph Rosenblatt, Tom Uttecht, Bill Williams, and Laurence Rathsack (Instructors at UW-Milwaukee).

VISIT maramanningstudio.com TO LEARN MORE. 

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Nancy B. Frank

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Nancy B. Frank

"What amazes me most about the partnership with a horse is that they allow us on their backs, but that is exactly what creates the tension in my paintings; the partnership between equine and human.  The images are larger than life yet intimate, and hopefully, capture the beauty and power and grace of the horse, yet the horses are bitted and bound with reins.  The human factor is always present, but never within the frame except for perhaps a suggestion. It is the special agreement and the spirit of both which make the paintings shine with light and life."

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Lara Branca

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Lara Branca

Lara Branca is creating a series of abstract expressionist paintings focusing on the equine form. The work focuses on the feeling of the horse's form in movement, in life. The paintings have rhythmic gesture as a foundation. The work references natural light, settings, and color but connect with the subconscious mind. They evoke emotion, motion and empathy. "The paintings focus on the idea of the horses moving in the landscape, seen through my feeling for the animals and their environment, which is a product of my experiences with them on the ground."

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Flair Robinson

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Flair Robinson

Be Unbroken is Flair Robinson's newest large-scale installation highlighting the healing power of the natural world. "Many people are in a state where the world feels broken. When we separate ourselves from nature, we are not at our best. Being out there in it is being whole." Robinson's imagery, colors, and environment remind us not only of our universal place, but also the confluence of the earthly and the eternal. A vibrant orange coyote anchors the installation as the guardian and harbinger. The cleansing rain, the attentive moon, the persisting waterfall, and other symbolic images unify to create an atmosphere both grounding and mystical. Although a personal journey for the artist, Be Unbroken carries a resonant and timely message.

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Andrea Martens

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Andrea Martens

Andrea Martens is a visual artist focused in mixed media printmaking, living and working in Durango, Colorado. In addition to creating in the studio, she teaches art at Fort Lewis College and at the University of Maine at Augusta’s Distance Education Program. Andrea received her MFA in Printmaking from Colorado State University and received her Post-Baccalaureate Certificate from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.  She holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Psychology from Virginia Tech with minors in art and biology.  In her art, she uses a combination of materials and processes to examine the human/animal relationship, as well as its connection to our environment in contemporary industrial society. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally. 

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Apoc

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Apoc

Telluride Arts’ HQ gallery in Telluride, Colorado presents work by Patrick E. Felsenthal, a writer, filmmaker, musician, graphic designer and artist. He releases music best described as art rap under the name Apoc and creates art and design pieces as PFels. On October 5th he will be launching a show at the Telluride Arts HQ Gallery that incorporates both of these projects. Apoc’s newest music video, Hurricane Goddamn! will be premiered in the US during the October 5th Art Walk. Props, costumes, and storyboards from the production will be on display throughout the exhibition. Also being featured will be Optalgia, a mixed-media body of artwork by Pfels. The Art Walk opening reception will be held Thursday, October 5, 5-8 p.m.

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Margaret Rinkevich

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Margaret Rinkevich

Margaret’s work develops intuitively.  It is composed of a confluence of multiple sensations drawn from her own experiential landscape.  There is an all-consuming mental grind in the creative process, and her objective is to achieve visually arresting images.  The goal in this series is to make the apparently simple relationships of form and color charged with as much force, feeling and meaning as possible.

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Micheline Klagsbrun

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Micheline Klagsbrun

On a simple level, Micheline Klagsbrun began with the intention to display side-by-side work done in her East Coast studio with work done here in Telluride. She has always been interested in the sense of place in art. At a deeper level, Klagsbrun is also fascinated by the parallels that can be found between cultures widely separated by time and geography.

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